Revealing Voices: Michaela Manson

Posted Posted in Revealing Voices

In a 2013 letter, philosophers Rae Langton and John Dupre criticize a type of popular reasoning. Their target is the position that physical differences, including brain differences, that correlate with sex categories are both naturally necessary, and normative in the sense that exhibiting these differences is somehow appropriate. The target of their criticism further infers […]

Revealing Voices: Chris Meyns

Posted Posted in Revealing Voices

Chris Meyns’s post is part of our Revealing Voices blog series.  In 1758, a revolutionary text left London-based printer S. Richardson, swiftly finding its way from booksellers in The Strand and Pall Mall to the shelves of hundreds of philosophically inclined households. Supported by over 100 subscribers in an early form of crowdfunding, here was the […]

Revealing Voices: Roy Auh

Posted Posted in Revealing Voices

Roy Auh’s post is part of our Revealing Voices blog series.  On August 16th in Beijing, I had the opportunity to present a paper about Project Vox at the 24th World Congress of Philosophy. A world’s fair for all things academic philosophy, this conference by the International Federation of Philosophical Societies boasted an attendance of 8000 […]

Announcement: Du Châtelet Prize in Philosophy of Physics

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Project Vox is pleased to announce the Du Châtelet Prize in Philosophy of Physics, an award that celebrates excellence in philosophy of physics and promotes breadth across the field both historically and philosophically. The prize—supported by Duke in collaboration with the Studies in History and Philosophy of Science—will be awarded next Spring to a U.S. or international […]

Revealing Voices: Deborah Boyle

Posted Posted in Revealing Voices

Deborah Boyle’s post is part of our Revealing Voices blog series.  I first heard about Margaret Cavendish at a regional conference in 2001, and I was fascinated. I borrowed the presenter’s copy of Paper Bodies—a collection containing Blazing World, Cavendish’s autobiography, and a few of her poems—for the weekend. Looking for more Cavendish to read after that, […]

Princess Elisabeth: The Newest Philosopher on Project Vox

Posted Posted in Announcement, News

The mind-body problem that troubles any serious Cartesian and has characterized debate in philosophy of mind for centuries does not find its source in a “typical” philosopher. The genius behind that crucial criticism of René  Descartes is a princess of  exiled Bohemian royalty. Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618-1680) never published a work of her own; everything currently known […]

Announcement: Project Vox on the New Narratives in the History of Philosophy Podcast

Posted Posted in Announcement

Check out Project Vox’s Andrew Janiak on the New Narratives in the History of Philosophy’s new podcast. The New Narratives project “aims to develop new narratives of our philosophical past that centrally include women thinkers, and thereby to reconfigure, enrich and reinvigorate the philosophical canon.” You can listen to Andrew talk about Project Vox, image culture, the philosophy […]

Announcement: New Materials for Teaching Philosophy

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We are excited to announce the addition of an Introduction to Philosophy narrative to our teaching materials page, along with several additional syllabi for the existing teaching narratives. The aim of our project is to promote the full integration of women philosophers into the canon through a narrative approach, situating them as active participants in the […]

Revealing Voices: Allauren Forbes

Posted Posted in Revealing Voices

Allauren Forbes’s post is part of our Revealing Voices blog series.    My first experience with early modern women philosophers was Mary Astell’s A Serious Proposal to the Ladies. Once I picked it up, I couldn’t put it down—I immediately fell in love. I was struck by how distinctive Astell’s voice was, despite her clear Cartesian commitments, […]

Revealing Voices: Jill Hernandez

Posted Posted in Revealing Voices

Jill Hernandez’s post is part of our Revealing Voices blog series.    It’s probably not shocking to learn that I quite accidentally stumbled upon the trove of scholarship by early modern women by way of studying well-trodden arguments by early modern men. The experience is akin to one I had this morning, when I looked at the other […]